A description of prejudice being the main factor that led to the holocaust

Hatred, Prejudice and Indifference Story Number: These are perhaps the greatest threats to our civilization. Each survival story also has an additional bond in that all of their stories begin with a jolt from normalcy, with a sudden upheaval of everyday life. Katz was born in Leipzig, Germany, Feb.

A description of prejudice being the main factor that led to the holocaust

In addition, usually a combination of motivations and pressures were in play. For the Holocaust as other periods of history, most scholars are wary of monocausal explanations.

Antisemitism and Support for Nazism Cultural explanations focus on values, beliefs, and prejudices, particularly antisemitism of various forms, including Nazi antisemitism. Within Nazi Germany, everyone did not support Nazism or the Nazi regime to the same degree and to the extent suggested by iconic photographs and film footage of Nazi-staged spectacles.

Enough enthusiasts could always be found to stage enormous public shows of support such as the annual Nazi Party rallies. On a day to day basis, the Nazi regime only needed most people to obey the law, try to stay out of trouble, and promote their own interests as best they could under the current circumstances.

Nazi propaganda and changing norms and laws did erode older, pre-Nazi ties to Christian teachings or leftist, anti-Nazi political beliefsespecially in the absence of the public expression of opposing views under the Nazi dictatorship. Still, those who espoused extreme antisemitic views remained a minority.

Thus the limited support of ordinary Germans for the national boycott of Jewish businesses of April 1,for example, and the shocked response of many Germans to the unprecedented violence and destruction of the Kristallnacht pogroms of November 9—10, In German-occupied countries, the need to prove loyalty to new German masters, particularly if one had previously cooperated with Soviet occupiers, provided many individuals with powerful motivation to collaborate.

Fighting Prejudice — United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Toward the end of the war, as German defeat seemed imminent, opportunism and the drive for self-preservation again rose to the fore: Generally, the course of the war proved critical in shaping the choices of individuals at all levels of German and European societies: Social-Psychological Explanations Let us look more fully at some of these explanations already alluded to earlier in the discussion.

Certainly fear for the consequences—if not physical harm than sanctions of some other kind—rose to the fore in various situations and at certain times—say, in the early months of Nazi rule characterized by terror to eliminate political opposition and during the war and occupation, especially in eastern Europe directly ruled by the Germans.

Focusing too much on fear, however, obscures and oversimplifies the more complicated dynamic behind the choices ordinary people made with regard to the persecution, then killing of Jews. Overemphasizing fear belies the range of complicit behaviors discussed above.

Doing so also ignores the political reality that even within Nazi Germany, leaders were sensitive to public opinion. This was true of ordinary people who may have had little or only superficial relations with individual Jews and of the traditional elites with more influence—Church, university, military, and business leaders.

From the beginning of Nazi rule and the fateful years leading up to them, these leaders failed to speak out against hateful speech, violence, and afterlegal measures that progressively stripped German Jews of their rights.

For example, mindful of popular opinion, German authorities did not harm or punish the non-Jewish wives of Jewish men when the women publicly protested the pending deportation of their loved ones in Berlin on February 27, That protests in these two cases aimed at specific actions or policies and not the regime itself was significant.

Sophie Scholl, Hans Scholl, Christian Probst, and other members of the resistance group were tried and executed as traitors to the Fatherland. In his book Ordinary Men, Christopher Browning analyzes the factors that turned most men of one police battalion into first-time, then hardened killers.

A similar dynamic may have been at play for the less studied eastern European collaborators who participated in the German-led shootings; only a few opted out of the face-to-face killing of men, women, and children to serve as guards or in other capacities.Students will analyze, discuss, and explain the range of choices available to individuals, groups, and nations during the Holocaust and explore the possible motivations and reasons for decision making in .

The Holocaust is an example of prejudice and discrimination taken to the extreme. One can see its legacy in the efforts of some postwar activists to combat religious, racial, ethnic, and gender stereotypes. Stunned by the atrocities in Europe, many Americans turned to the fight against prejudice and discrimination at home.

- Prejudice and the Holocaust Prejudice was the main factor that led to the holocaust.

Stereotypes and Prejudices | The Holocaust History - A People's and Survivor History - srmvision.com

For some, resisting these forms of oppression was survival. Considering the dehumanizing the Nazis had forced upon the Jews, people took whatever courage and strength they had to get through this period of time.

represent how the events of the Holocaust played out in Germany. As Germany occupied other countries, they applied sim - before being deported to Auschwitz or other srmvision.com learn more about Hilberg’s stages, Hilberg’s six stages that led to the Holocaust.

A description of prejudice being the main factor that led to the holocaust

We suggest you begin by presenting stu -. Introduction to the Holocaust The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators.

Table of Contents During the Holocaust, a huge percentage of the German population — 8.

The Nazis came to power in Germany in January May 05,  · Prejudice was the main factor that led to the holocaust. For some, resisting these forms of oppression was survival.

Considering the dehumanizing the Nazis had forced upon the Jews, people took whatever courage and strength they had to get through this period of time.

Stereotypes and Prejudices | The Holocaust History - A People's and Survivor History - srmvision.com