Xenophobia in homers oddyssey

Book 3 At Pylos, Telemachus and Mentor Athena in disguise witness an impressive religious ceremony in which dozens of bulls are sacrificed to Poseidon, the god of the sea. Nestor, however, has no information about the Greek hero. He recounts that after the fall of Troy a falling-out occurred between Agamemnon and Menelaus, the two Greek brothers who had led the expedition. Menelaus set sail for Greece immediately, while Agamemnon decided to wait a day and continue sacrificing on the shores of Troy.

Xenophobia in homers oddyssey

This is a speculative theory which is not entirely new. That is, it was not simply born of the current publishing trend towards creating conspiracy-theory scenarios revealing the "secret history" of a contentious figure or event previously covered up.

Xenophobia in homers oddyssey

However, modern books tend to go for grand schemes which don't simply suggest a tale based on an early northern pioneering voyage, but claim a 1: It's suggested in some of these modern books that the Odyssey contains a secret navigational code hidden inside a novelistic wonder tale. Usually translated from German, French, or Dutch originals, they tend however to be disdained or ridiculed by the mainstream media in England.

You can now do this yourself if interested, link here. Not to pick on Wilkens, this interpretation is credited to a 19th-C. Evidently there were northern-odyssey books some two centuries ago, though again not in English.

Cailleux has been cited as inspiration by other postwar authors besides Wilkens, like the French amateur sailor Gilbert Pillot in his [trans.

Other authors use both sides of the Atlantic in their search for similar place-names or geographic features.

The underlying premise of both the traditional Mediterranean theory and the North Atlantic one is that Homer based his Odyssey on early long-distance coast-navigation guides called in Greek periplous, which provided sailing times and directions, and coast features to watch out for.

At first, this may seem odd due to our standard mental image of Ulysses and his bronzed crew sailing the sunny Mediterranean, but this is likely based on modern screen versions being filmed there. Instead, you can postulate a long-distance voyage west across and out of the Med. Ulysses is blown off course westward by a storm for 17 days, which Gilbert Pillot says would more than do it if you work out the maths, i.

SparkNotes: The Odyssey: Books 3–4

This puts the story onto a larger world map and would help explain why Odysseus was away for 19 years — he went literally to the edge of the known world. Others point to Homeric references to the singing swan, which is found only in northern latitudes.

There are also apparent references to tidal currents in river mouths, something the Med is too small to generate, as well as the Scylla-Charybdis whirlpool being dangerous thrice a day.

Pillot identifies it with the Correyvreckan whirlpool off Mull which nearly drowned George Orwell. Strabo, who investigated Homeric geography, thought Plutarch might be right. The poet Apollodorus thought the Odyssey unhistorical, but part-set in the North Atlantic.

The Roman historian Tacitus said there was a memorial in the far north of Caledonia, i. Scotland, commemorating the visit there of Ulysses the Roman version of Odysseus.

Tacitus also says in his Germania the tribes venerate the Greek hero Hercules. Odd because he was believed by ancient Greeks to have lived in the 13th C. Others, like 5th C.

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BC historian Thucydides, doubted the Iliad was historical - that their ancient Greeks forebears with their tiny city-states could have ever mounted a war on such a scale as at Troy. The theories cited up to now have suggested an early voyage by Mediterranean sailors Greek, or perhaps Phoenician west and then north, recorded in a precious periplous which was worth keeping secret.

Later, the senate at Phoenician Carthage would reward any merchant captain who wrecked his ship if he could not shake off pursuit, in order to protect their secret trade routes from their rival Rome - which suggests these did remain secret until well into the Roman era. The ancient Greek mariners could thereby remember yet protect the key details sailing directions, times, dangers of their all-important northern trade route.

This was to the sought-after sources of tin the Kassiterides or Tin Isles, which the 5th-C BC historian Herodotus complained were unlocatablewhich were the key to prosperity in the Bronze Age. Tin was needed to make good-quality bronze and there was then no known supply of tin ore in the Med.

The Kassiterides or Tin Isles were later identified as various islets off the northern coast of Spain, Brittany, and the southwest coast of Britain. Wilkens also plumps for tin as the cause of his Britain-versus-NW Europe war. This is how the Iliad ends up being given an entirely northern interpretation, for it makes more sense in terms of fitting the idea of a Nordic origin for the epic than does the Odyssey, whose voyage begins with known places in the Med.Hate Crimes, Xenophobia At an October 16 presentation by civil society experts at the South African Human Rights Commission, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) in South Africa pointed out that for the murders during the violence, only one perpetrator was reportedly punished.

A summary of Books 3–4 in Homer's The Odyssey.

About The Author Not all Americans, or even all Christians, are at ease with this idea.
The Odyssey (Paperback) Book Discussion Thu, 20 Feb
Xenophobia - Wikipedia The massacre of the Jewish Banu Qurayza in Arabia. Racism in Saudi Arabia against labor workers who are foreigners, mostly from developing countries.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Odyssey and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. A summary of Books 3–4 in Homer's The Odyssey. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Odyssey and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Definition of xenophobia in English: xenophobia.

From the SparkNotes Blog

noun mass noun. Dislike of or prejudice against people from other countries. ‘the resurgence of racism and xenophobia’ More example sentences ‘National and cultural identities are mixed; xenophobia and rage mirror xenophobia and rage.’.

A summary of Books 7–8 in Homer's The Odyssey. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Odyssey and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

A summary of Books 7–8 in Homer's The Odyssey. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Odyssey and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Xenophobia in South Africa - Wikipedia